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Safety Tips for Your Jr. Pedestrian

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Children have a host of road related dangers to contend with due to the latest technological advances that can distract drivers. In order to ensure that your child is safe while making the trek to school, a friend’s home or the park, you’ll find the following tips to be helpful.

Walk with an Adult

North Carolina traffic statistics state that traffic related accidents were the leading cause of death in children between the ages of four and 14. These unfortunate incidents often result in the consultation of a car accident lawyer in Charlotte, Raleigh, or Greensboro or even death.

It can be easy for a child to get distracted by talking to their friends and fail to notice oncoming traffic. Children who are 10 years old and under should never walk anywhere without the assistance of an adult. They can ensure their safety to even greater lengths by holding the hand of an adult when crossing the street or walking through a highly trafficked parking lot.

Crossing the Street

If your child is navigating their way to school, a crossing guard, community service officer or administrative personnel should be assisting them. School zones are typically congested with other parents and caregivers dropping off and picking up their children for the day. This scenario makes for a very busy scene which requires an attentive eye.

If they are crossing other intersections alone, they need to obey traffic signals and stop signs. A crosswalk or safe corner should also be used when crossing the street because it alerts drivers to be cautious. You should also instruct your child on how to look right, left and right again before making their way across the road.

Use Extreme Caution

There are laws and road signs in place to alert drivers of areas where children may be crossing. While a driver needs to obey the rules, you need to instruct your child to use extreme caution when crossing the street. Texting, talking on the phone, eating and reaching to change the radio station can cause a driver to become distracted.

This can make them lose their focus and fail to see the child crossing the roadway. Keeping alert to other drivers and dangerous situations can allow them the opportunity to get out of the way or steer clear of the dangers. Bright clothing can also make your child easier to be seen by other drivers on the roads.

Take an Interactive Role

As a parent, you need to teach your child rules on how to be safe and this should begin at an early age. Things such as never crossing the street without an adult and how to look both ways are extremely important.

As they get older, you can also do your part by keeping in close contact on their whereabouts. If they say they are going to a friend’s home down the street, you can have them call you the moment they arrive. You can also teach them to never retrieve a toy, ball or pet from the middle of the street without looking both ways and ensuring the coast is clear.

Hospitals and trauma centers have seen a dramatic rise in child pedestrian accidents with the latest advances in electronic gadgets. However, teaching your child the above safety tips can prevent them from sustaining a possible pedestrian related injury.

Jamica Bell is a freelance writer and blogger. As a concerned parent of seven, she has made it a point to teach safety tips to each of her jr. pedestrians. Regardless of your locale,  parents faced with a case involving a child related pedestrian accident should consult with a car accident lawyer in Charlotte or the area of the occurrence.

Photo credit: http://flic.kr/p/5C2czd   

About youmefit

I am a college student that is trying to stay physically fit and eat healthy. We all know how hard this is, so I am trying to post some tips, and get some discussions started so we can all learn from each other.

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